Torre, Torre, Torre

Let me spin you a yarn.

 And at the end you will say darn.

Truth is of what I speak.

 A tribute to Joseph Torre I do seek.

What I found was a satori.

Spiritual awakenings can lead to glory.

Joe  a Brave Cardinal manager for them Bombers.

He called the Angels.  Met the Mets.

Managed to not to dodge the Dodgers.

Hall of Fame.  A baseball executive in his own elite category.

Joseph Paul Torre that’s amore.

How could I ever forget 1996. I wish my mind would go  blank.

Because James Joseph Leyritz made bank.  He put my Braves in the tank.

Born December 27 on my birthday.  Wohler’s pitch he did yank.

Because the Joseph’s it seems had us outflanked.

Enough Joe’s and woes. After all it was the Show.

 Let, this be a tribute to Joseph Torre.  Aka Frank. Born Frank Joseph Torre.

He should have been a Yank.  Think Frank. From Brooklyn, NY.

Playing first base number 14 Frank “the Yank” Torre.

Gold glover in his own right.  His story warmed our soul, as my heart sank.

Let’s not forget brother Rocco.  No Joe in this Torre that I know.

So that’s the baseball  Torre’s and All-American Bordeaux.

Thanks,  Joe for the memories! 

RGH

12-11-2020

Why Cardinals dealt Orlando Cepeda for Joe Torre

For such a straightforward deal, the trade of Joe Torre to the Cardinals for Orlando Cepeda took some twists and turns involving pitcher Nolan Ryan and center fielder Curt Flood.

On March 17, 1969, the Cardinals sent Cepeda to the Braves for Torre in a swap of first basemen.

The Braves were shopping Torre because he was feuding with general manager Paul Richards and hadn’t signed a contract. Most thought Torre would go to the Mets, who’d been in trade talks with the Braves for several weeks.

The Mets offered pitcher Nolan Ryan, first baseman Ed Kranepool, infielder Bob Heise and a choice of catchers, J.C. Martin or Duffy Dyer, for Torre and third baseman Bob Aspromonte, The Sporting News reported. Torre and Aspromonte were Brooklyn natives.

Ryan, who would become baseball’s all-time leader in strikeouts, impressed the Braves but was a raw talent. Richards rejected the four-for-two proposal because he wanted catcher Jerry Grote or outfielder Amos Otis, but the Mets “labeled them untouchables,” according to Atlanta Constitution sports editor Jesse Outlar.

“We aren’t making a deal with the Mets unless they change their minds,” Richards said.

When the Mets wouldn’t budge, the Braves offered Torre to the Dodgers for catcher Tom Haller, but the Dodgers weren’t interested, the Constitution reported.

Cardinals general manager Bing Devine offered Cepeda and Flood for Torre and outfielder Felipe Alou, according to the Constitution, but Richards wouldn’t trade Alou, so the clubs settled on Cepeda for Torre. Seven months later, when the Cardinals traded Flood to the Phillies, he refused to report, prompting his legal challenge of the reserve clause and opening a path to the creation of free agency.

Cepeda feels chill

The Cardinals were willing to trade Cepeda because his performance declined in 1968 and he miffed management by reporting late to spring training in 1969.

After batting .325 with 111 RBI and winning the National League Most Valuable Player Award with the Cardinals in 1967, Cepeda hit .248 with 73 RBI in 1968.

Cepeda “found himself taken advantage of by well-wishing friends who helped him pile up debts and other problems that didn’t endear him to the Redbirds management … especially when at times he’d duck out of the dugout between innings to conduct personal matters,” Bob Broeg of the St. Louis Post-Dispatch reported.

The Cardinals hoped Cepeda would be more focused in 1969, but he informed Devine by telegram he would report late to spring training.

When Cepeda arrived at camp on March 5, he said he’d been sick, but Devine fined him $250 for reporting 48 hours later than he said he would.

Cepeda said he detected “a coolness” from Devine, and Broeg reported “Cepeda realized there had been a change in attitude toward him.”

“Bing was not terribly friendly, and he was all business,” Cepeda said in his 1998 book “Baby Bull.”

In his 2004 book “The Memoirs of Bing Devine,” Devine said, “I thought Cepeda might be on the way down.”

I almost forgot sir.  If they ever make another movie about the Joes.

Remember the name Joseph Pierre Torry from St. Louis, Missouri.

He’s in a Hall of Fame too!  That concludes my Poetic Justice for number Six.

Ironically, Cha Cha Cepeda played parts of six years for the Braves.

And to think we could have had the Ryan Express. Sorry.

And your reckoning continued in 1999 to sweep up another crown.

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